Daily Devotion- Romans 5

Peace with God

Let us continue our journey through the book of Romans. I want to thank you for the significant and positive response to our study. I pray that these emails are beneficial to your walk with the Lord and help you on your journey. 

Read: Romans 5

Peace with God. That is a statement that we may not have full comprehension. Building upon what Paul has already stated, we are not at peace with God. Humanity has exchanged the truth of God for a lie. We have worshipped the creation instead of the creator. We have exchanged the truth for a lie. Let us dive into Romans 5 together and see what the Lord has for us. 

1. Peace with God (1-2). In the very first verse of Romans 5, we find tremendous hope. Because we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through Jesus. It is not because of works that we are justified. We’ve already established that there is nothing that you can do to establish favor with God, see chapter 3. Because of faith in Christ, we are justified; we are forgiven, we are redeemed. It is because of the work of Christ that we are justified, and because of this justification, we have peace with God. We are no longer enemies of God; we are children. We have grace, unmerited favor, from God in which we stand! These first two verses are beautiful verses that we can take great hope in. 

2. God’s purpose in our suffering (3-5). Paul begins verse three with a particular set of words. Rejoice in our sufferings. When is the last time that you have been glad to suffer? Suffering in the Christian life is a result of many factors, but none of it is wasteful. First, God uses some suffering for corrective measures. When a child does not obey its parents, it is disciplined. We know from God’s Word that He disciplines those whom He loves. Secondly, for the glory of God. We can often suffer to bring glory to the name of Jesus. This one can be difficult for non-believers and many Christians. Our suffering is meant to bring our dependence on the Lord as well as point others to Him. We know this is true because, in John 9, a man is born blind with only the reason to bring glory to God. Thirdly, because there is sin in our world, we often suffer as the result of our sin, someone else’s sin, or because our world is infected by sin. Our world is broken; people get cancer, earthquakes, etc. Lastly, to build your character. God is in the business of making us more like Christ. He will often use suffering to humble and prune us to become more like Christ. 

3. God’s Love for us (6-8). Verse 8 may be one of my favorite verses in the book of Romans. This verse is even better understood in light of everything that has been said thus far in the book of Romans. Remember that we are immoral and wicked people. We’ve exchanged the truth for a lie, and we worship creation over creator. We deserve the full wrath of God. But because of Christ, we have hope. At the right time, the perfection of time, Christ died. He didn’t die for the perfect; He died for the ungodly. The ones that have been describing in the previous books. Paul writes, who would die for a terrible person? Someone might be willing to risk their life for a great person, but scum? No way. But that is exactly what Christ did! While we were scum, the worst of the worst, He died for us! Praise God! I can’t help but praise Him at this great and beautiful truth! 

4. Justified by His blood (9-11). In this section, there are some great truths that are easy for the Christian to overlook and forget about. Paul writes that we have now been justified by His blood and saved from the wrath of God. As Christians, we often do not speak about the wrath of God enough. The wrath of God is to be poured out on sin. Because of sin, wrath is to come. We often think of wrath as someone angry and red in the face. This is not a good illustration of God’s wrath. God’s wrath is described as weeping and gnashing of teeth, the lake of fire, etc. This is what we deserve, yet, because of the blood of Christ, we have been justified! We’ve been made right with God! He took our wrath for us! We need to celebrate this fact day in and day out. We were enemies of God, choosing Hell over Him. But because of Christ, we’ve been reconciled. 

5. Death in Adam (12-14). Sin entered the world through the sin of Adam. Because of the sin of Adam, sin came into the world. Now because we are children of Adam, we are sinners by nature and by choice. Paul explains to them that even before the Law was given, sin was there. The Law was meant to expose this sin to those who know the Law. When we are born, we are born sinners. It’s in our nature; it doesn’t take long to notice in a child their sinful nature. You don’t have to teach a child to be selfish or to lie; they naturally know how to do those things. Now, these verses have caused lots of controversy in the Christian faith. There are several views on what this means for us today. I will present them and give a brief explanation. 

A. Pelagianism. Pelagian was the opponent of St. Augustine. This view says that sin is directly related to the person and not to Adam. That we are our own, this is a prominent teaching in liberal theology and easily refuted by scripture. 

B. Corruption view. This view says that we are all corrupted by sin. Though we are condemned because of our sin apart from Adam, while we are condemned because of our sin, we are also judged because of our sin nature, which is because of the fall of man. 

C. Augustinianism. This is the view that was proposed by St. Augustine. It holds that the human race sinned in Adam because, in a literal physical sense, all future generations were in Adam at the time. So, when he acted, the whole race acted, and when he was judged, the entire race was judged literally in him. This view is still held by many today, while it may be convincing; it does not capture the meaning of this text fully.

D. Federalism. Federalism is the view that is most commonly held by protestants today. This view states that Adam was our representative head. That Adam was the representative for all humanity. Think of an ambassador. He stood to represent humanity before God. 

In this view, the point is not that all people sin, though they do, but instead that Adam stood for them so that, when he sinned, not only was Adam judged, but they were judged, too. It is because Adam sinned that death passed upon all.

 Boice, J. M. (1991–). Romans: The Reign of Grace (Vol. 2, p. 566). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.

This is the view that Southern Baptist predominantly holds to and the one that is seen in scripture. 

6. The free gift (15-17). Paul contrasts this section with the previous. Contrasting Christ to Adam. Now those who have placed their faith in Christ are represented by Christ. He is our new representative head. Through Adam, we are brought condemnation, but through Christ, we are brought justification. We now reign in life because of the work of Christ. 

7. Made Righteous (18-21). As Paul continues to compare and contrast Christ with Adam, this is where you and I must sin praises to God for what is done through Christ. That through the act of Christ, we are made righteous. That because of Christ, we are no longer condemned, rather we are justified. That because of the representation of Adam and our sin, we are doomed to suffer wrath, because of the righteousness of Christ and faith in Him we are promised eternal life! This is something to celebrate! 

I am so sorry that this email is so long. I genuinely love Romans 5! There is so much that we can learn from this chapter and more to celebrate!

Pastor Aaron

Daily Devotion- Romans 4

Justified by Faith

Let us continue our journey through the book of Romans. I want to thank you for the significant and positive response to our study. I pray that these emails are beneficial to your walk with the Lord and help you on your journey.

Read: Romans 4

Chapter four of the book of Romans is the rational argument. Paul is showing his readers that the Gospel is not something new; instead, the Gospel comes from old. The Gospel is God’s plan of redemption from before the foundation of the world. Paul’s argument in chapter four is the Gospel is nothing new, rather old. He was looking to Abraham, the forefather of the Jewish faith. Let us begin our journey in Romans 4.

1. Look at Abraham (1-5): Paul begins his journey by looking at Abraham. Abraham is the father of Judaism and the most important figure outside of Christ. It was to Abraham that he was promised to be the father of many nations (Genesis 17:5). In looking at Abraham, there are a few things that we must take note.

A. There was nothing of Abraham. There was nothing special about Abraham that would have made God choose him. He was a coward at points; we see this with his wife. The calling of Abraham was not based on his merit; as you know, Abraham was not a God-fearing man until the Lord called him.

B. He failed. Another truth we know about Abraham was that he failed. He was unable to trust entirely in the Lord and took matters into his own hands. He didn’t live out faith in God perfectly.

Because of these things, Paul points his readers to the understanding that Abraham was not justified by his actions. Abraham was not justified because he did everything correctly. Instead, Abraham was justified by faith. Genesis 15:6 “And he believed the Lord, and he counted it to him as righteousness.“ He was not considered righteous because of his pedigree, nor his works, instead, he was justified by his faith. Our works do not justify us as Christians, rather our faith in Christ, our faith in our substitute.

2. Look at David (6-8): Next, Paul looks at king David. The man after God’s own heart. Yet, David was an adulterer and a murderer. David knew the terrible burden of sin. Remember that he had committed adultery with Bathsheba, Uriah’s wife, then had Uriah killed. But David experienced forgiveness. David writes of this and sings of this truth. We see in Psalm 51 David’s anguish over his sin and this psalm of knowing his great forgiveness.

3. The Seal (9-12): Paul turns back to Abraham. Abraham was considered righteous before he was given the sign of the covenant. He did not receive circumcision until after he had already been considered righteous, the circumcision being the symbol of his righteousness. The Jews had gotten this out of order; they had believed that it was the circumcision that made them righteous rather than the faith.

4. The Promise (13-25): Here, we see Paul turn the corner in his argument. He has already established that Abraham had been justified by his faith and not by his works. That Abraham’s circumcision came after his credit of righteousness. Paul then begins to look at what if it was obedience to the Law that was justification.

A. Faith is null. (14). If it is adherents of the Law who are to be the heirs, faith is null. If it is by your obedience to the Law that you are to be a child of God, then why would Abraham be crediting righteous?

B. The Promise is void (14). The Promise is that his offspring would be a blessing to all generations. That God would make him a great nation, not that he would have to make himself a great nation.

C. Law brings wrath (15). The Law exposes sin (we see this argument laid out earlier.) If it is adherence to the Law, what happens when we all fail the Law, which we do.

D. It depends on faith (16-17). It depends not on the Law; rather, it depends on faith. Just as Abraham is credited righteous not by his works but by his faith, it is the same for you and I. We are credited righteous not by our works but by our faith in the Lord Jesus. It was in God that he had placed his faith and not in the Law

E. Our justification (18-25) Though Abraham was old, really old, he still believed that God could do what He said that He was going to do, make Abraham a great nation. We see that Abraham continued to keep the faith in God that He would make him a great nation. We see this in Genesis, and it is for our sake that we see it is by faith, not by his works. For us, it is not based upon our works and what we do, instead it is based on what has been done for us. We are not the justification for our own sin; justification comes through Christ alone and the work that He accomplished. There is no amount of work that you can do to pay the debt that you owe; rather, you must put your faith in another.

Our faith and trust matters. Who you put your trust in matters. Are you trusting in your own merits, or are you trusting in another? The only one you can trust in is Christ. He is to be praised forever and ever, Amen!

Pastor Aaron

 

Romans 3

Romans Chapter 3

Let us continue our journey through the book of Romans. I want to thank you for the significant and positive response to our study. I pray that these emails are beneficial to your walk with the Lord and help you on your journey.

Read: Romans 3

Romans 3 contains one of the most famous passages in all of the Bible. In this chapter, we see the state of man, our proclivity for sinfulness. We also see the hope of the Lord for man. The hope that is for all humanity, not just the Jew, but to all who would believe int he Lord Jesus Christ. Let us begin.

1. God’s righteousness (1-8): Paul begins this chapter with an interesting statement. The statement is actually translated that the Jews have that they are born with the “oracles” of God, or Words of God. It was the Jews that had the Words of God. Which leads us to ask the question that we must wrestle with, do we believe the Bible is the Word of God? We learn later in Paul’s letter to Timothy that the scriptures are God-breathed. Before the New Covenant and New Testament, the Jews possessed the Word of God. That was their advantage. In verse 3, we dive into a deep understanding of what Paul is saying. Here we see Paul posing a question that seems to be suggesting that because many Jews will not believe in Christ, that God has violated His covenant with them. He asks the question, “What if some were unfaithful? Does their faithlessness nullify the faithfulness of God?” He returns later in chapters 9-11 to answer those questions more in-depth. Let me look to those for us and summarize them the best I can.

A. Romans 9:1-21- Here, we see that God is sovereign over humanity. He does all things justly, and this means that He is just in passing over Jews for a time. Paul is showing us this by looking at God’s sovereign choice of Abraham, Isaac, etc. That by God’s passing over of the Jews is not an injustice.

B. Romans 9:22-33- God here prophesied that Israel would reject Christ, and Gentiles would be offered salvation.

C. Romans 10:1-21- The Gospel is offered to the Gentiles, and this is really for the good of Israel. It is intended to provoke them to jealousy of relationship with God. It was a last-ditch effort to reach out to the ones that had already rejected Him.

It continues as you will see later, but God is still faithful to the Jews though they are not faithful to Him. This is the same as you and me today. Though we are not faithful to God many times in our life, He is still faithful to us. Amen! Paul also answers some paths that some will take in this understanding. The first is looking at God’s role as the Judge. The question is this, if our unrighteousness leads to God’s showing of mercy and grace, then how can God judge us for those things? But we know that answer all too well; the end does not justify the means. Secondly, one might ask, how can God judge my sin if my sin leads to something beneficial. Here we see that Paul doesn’t even answer this but moves to the final thought. Let’s do evil so that good may come. This thought goes through many forms. If we can do nothing well, then why not do evil? Why does it matter if we live by the Law or not? Paul will answer this later in Romans 6, by NO MEANS!

2. No one is righteous (9-20)- So are the Jews better off because they have the Law? The answer is no because all are charged with sin and are under sin. This is a grievous charge. That all of humanity is under sin. We are condemned as sinners. Look at verses 10-18. Those are not words that describe someone that is doing righteous things; rather, it is describing every one of us. We are all condemned under the weight of our sin nature.

A. No one is righteous: 9-11. No one is righteous. No one. No-one includes you. I know that may seem like harsh news, but it is true. We are not righteous. Even the deeds that we think are good and true are tainted with sin nature. We don’t seek God; our sin nature does not naturally seek God; instead, it seeks its own wants and desires, sin. This is bad news. It’s getting worse…

B. No one does good: 12. You do not do good things. Jesus says to the rich young ruler, why do you call me good? No one is good except God. There are no good people; we are all sinful. The measure of good is not of human measure but of God’s perfect and righteous standard, which condemns all.

C. We are broken: 13-18. Look at what Paul says about humanity. Man is wicked in their talk, in their actions, and our thoughts of God. When I first began ministry, I was surprised at some of the stuff that I would hear that people would do. Today not so much. It does not surprise me of the capability of man to sin. It’s in us. Paul says that we all have that in us. Apart from Christ, we are hopeless; we are wicked.

3. Righteous by Faith: 21-31. Paul begins this section with the best word, but. But now the righteousness of God has manifested apart from the Law! Here we begin to see a turning point in Paul’s writing. By this point, the reader should be convinced of the wickedness of humanity and of themselves. To end at verse 20 would be a detrimental ending. But here we find hope. In verse 22, the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For all who believe, not just the Jew, but to all! We can be included in that all. God is offering righteousness to men and women that is apart from the Law and apart of themselves. It is righteousness that is given freely to those who believe in another. That their righteousness is not in and of themselves, rather it is of Christ. The righteousness of grace. There is no difference in Jew and Gentile, for all have sinned, but both can be justified in the same way by Christ Jesus.

He is our propitiation, which means he has turned aside the wrath of God against us. Christ’s blood was shed that the wrath of God was poured out upon Him. He redeemed us from our sin, paid for us, and we are justified in God’s sight, made right, all because of the blood of Christ.

“What can wash away our sin? Nothing but the blood of Jesus!”

Paul coming back to his argument of the Law, if we are justified by faith, then does this negate the Law? The answer is no; rather, in Christ, we have fulfilled the Law through Christ. We have upheld the Law through Christ, who has perfectly upheld the Law on our behalf; our response is not to continue sinning, rather seek to live a life that is being conformed more into the image of Christ. To make His name known and famous.

I hope this is encouraging to you, I’m sorry if this seems confusing. I hope to help us better understand this book and indeed be thankful for what Paul is telling us of our wonderful Lord!

Thank you for reading! I love and miss you!

Pastor Aaron

Daily Devotion

Happy Tuesday!

I hope that this email finds you well. I want to encourage you to press forward in following the Lord. Trust in Him during this time.

 

Read: Acts 28

In the final chapter of the book of Acts, we see Paul’s last recorded defense to the Jews. We know from church history that Paul would later be executed for the faith. He, along with many other followers of Jesus, would be murdered for their faith in Christ. Yet, they remained faithful to the Gospel. So what can we take from this chapter to encourage us in our walk with the Lord today?

 

1. Jesus, forgiveness is real. I know this may seem like a unique point for this chapter, but if someone is willing to be burned alive for the faith, or crucified, then we must know that Jesus’ love and forgiveness is real. Jesus really did die, Jesus really did take on your payment, Jesus really does offer forgiveness. You can take hope in the fact that you often take this for granted, that many died for this truth.

 

2. Jesus gave you a real mission. The book of Acts shows men and women that took the mission of God seriously. They knew that Christ had given them a mission to accomplish, and they were going to make sure that they did everything that they could to see to it. Every time I read the book of Acts, I am convicted by this point. We go day by day as if the Gospel is not of first importance. We live like everything can wait, yet the Gospel can not.

 

The question that we must continue to wrestle with, how can we be faithful to the Gospel during a pandemic, the virus does not stop the Gospel. Quarantine does not stop the Gospel. The question that we must ask, how do we creatively share it? This is one that you and I must wrestle with.

 

Pastor Aaron

 

Daily Devotion- Romans 2

Romans Chapter 2

Let us continue our journey through the book of Romans. I want to thank you for the significant and positive response to our study. I pray that these emails are beneficial to your walk with the Lord and help you on your journey.

 

Read: Romans 2

 

There is considerable debate amongst theologians who the intended audience of chapter 2 is to. Protestant reformers such as Martin Luther and John Calvin conclude that Paul is writing to the Jewish believers in the Church of Rome. While scholars like D.A. Carson and R.C. Sproul argue that he is writing to all the believers, I tend to agree with Carson and Sproul. While later in Romans, Paul does address the Jews directly, here it seems to address a human trait, not just a Jewish tendency. I believe that I have struggled with these issues, as I am sure that many others have as well. With that, let’s dive into God’s Word together.

 

1. God’s Judgement (1-11): It seems that in this chapter that Paul is repeating himself. While this is an excellent tactic in teaching, Paul is switching his audience from all mankind to speaking directly to his readers. In the previous chapter, he condemns all of humanity to living in sin. That the fact that we are able to take another breath is because of the wonderful grace and mercy of God, here Paul is addressing those in the church. In chapter 1, Paul did not menace his words in confronting the sinfulness of humanity. It would be easy for many to try and excuse themselves from this description. “Well, that’s not me…” Paul seeming to head us off at our internal debate confront us head-on. We say to ourselves, “I am not like those pagans that worship false idols.” Are we? Do you put other things on the throne of your heart? “I’ve never killed anyone!” Have you hated anyone in your heart? We tend to excuse our sin in the sight of others, yet the standard of living is not others, it’s perfection. Paul’s point is that we fail even our own judgments, our own standards. Therefore, Paul presents two paths before his readers. The way of the righteous and the way of the sinner.

 

The way of the righteous is seen as one that does the right thing. v.7, 9-10. Glory, honor, and immortality. To the one that always chooses to do the right thing. That they live an authentic life of holiness and godliness, only one issue for us; none of us do that. So what is the second way?

 

The way of the sinner. The ones that choose to do what they want to do, the ones that choose the way of their nature, we saw this way described in chapter one. Without the divine intervention of the Lord, this is the path in which we all choose. This is the path that we are all going towards—the path to eternal judgement.

 

2. God’s Judgement and the Law (12-29). In this section, we come across a challenging passage. One that I hope to give you some understanding, though I confess my feebleness at this endeavor. In this section, there are many different aspects to which we hope to understand and begin to grasp. So let us take this little by little.

 

A. Law Written on their hearts. (12-16) Paul writes that man is judged according to the Law of God. That according to the Law and our doing of the Law, we are judged. But the Gentiles were not given the Law to live by, therefore, how can one be judged by that Law? Paul says that they had the Law of God written on their hearts. They have their own conscience that they did not live by and obey that the Law that is written on their hearts accuses them of their sin apart even from the written Law.

 

B. The Law of God. (17-24) To the Jew that says, “I have the Law of God.” The ones that say that they live by that Law. Paul points to them the Law to which they seem to find their hope in morality is the very same Law that points back at them in their wickedness. We will see Jesus doing this very same argument in John 7 this weekend. The ones that look to the Law for their hope and justification should see their condemnation.

 

C. Circumcision of the heart. (25-29) To those who brag of their heritage and their tradition. “We have circumcision; we are God’s chosen people,” Paul states that it is of great value if you live out those commands entirely. But if you break the Law, then what value is it to you? You have failed to live up your end of the deal. The purpose of the Law was not for one to find salvation. The purpose of the Law was to be that of a mirror. To reveal to people that they could not live out the Law. Instead, they should look to the sacrifice of God. In the final verse of chapter 2, Paul gives us a look into that clue. That circumcision that matters is that of the heart, and that is performed not by human hands, but by the Spirit of God. When the Spirit changes one, his praise is not that of man, but of God. This is the reason that the book of Romans is so hard for so many. The book of Romans does not sugar coat the sinfulness of humanity. We like to think that we are not that bad. We have some good about us; we are just sick. Paul will let us know that we are not just sick; we are wretched people. Everything that we do is tainted by sin. There is no hope in and of yourself, none. The only hope that you can find is that of Christ Jesus.

 

I understand that I may have raised more questions than answers. I hope so. My goal is not to be a commentary for you, rather be one that gets you to dive deeper into the Word of God. I truly love you all, and I miss you.

I look forward to the day we worship together again.

Pastor Aaron

Daily Devotion- Romans 1

We Begin Romans

Today we begin the book of Romans. I want to start by saying that there is no possible way for me nor anyone else to explain the full richness of this book. Since we are going chapter by chapter, I hope to give you a good summary of what is going on, theological benefits, and application to your everyday. Please bear with me as we journey through this together. Feel free to email me questions that you may have concerning the chapter we cover! Also, there has been much debate amongst theologians for thousands of years on this book. I am but a tiny spec in the magnificent men and women that have sought to understand this book.

 

Read: Romans 1

 

Let us begin by setting up the book. The author is the apostle Paul, a giant of a theologian that had the equivalent of two Ph.D. degrees. He was super intelligent and yet blunt with the truth of the Gospel. He is writing to the church in Rome. Rome being the epicenter of the powerful Roman Empire. Understand that Paul is most likely corresponding to address a church filled with both Jews and Gentiles. Also, this church was being heavily persecuted by both the Jews and the Roman government. These things are important to understand in some of the language that Paul uses.

 

To understand this chapter, I want to break it down by sections. This way, we can hopefully grasp better what is being said.

 

1. Introduction: Paul gives a long introduction to his qualifications as well as letting the Romans know who the Gospel is really about. The reason Paul would give such long qualifications is there was a group of “teachers” that claimed to be super-apostles. They claimed to have special knowledge that the Apostles did not have. Paul wanted to let the Romans know who he was and how he had been called to be obedient. Though one aspect that I love about Paul was his ambition to point to Jesus, In verse 5, he makes the statement, “for the sake of His name,” meaning that we are to bring glory to Christ. The point of the Gospel is not our glory, no, the glory of Christ!

 

2. Longing to see them: This section should be encouraging and convicting. Paul is encouraging them because of their faithfulness to the Gospel. He wants to be with them and is continually praying for them. He hopes to come to them soon to be able to encourage them and push them forward, but also to preach the Gospel to them. As Christians, we need to hear the Gospel continually. To be reminded of the Good News of Christ. The part that is so convicting is how our longing to be together is? There are some that I’ve contacted that have not heard from anyone else in our church. I want to tell you that it is convicting. I pray that we all long to be together. I pray that we are all remembering one another in prayer and checking on one another. I am genuinely encouraged by our faithfulness to pray for the church, but I want to remember that we are called to be a family, life is better together. Let us long to be united and serve one another as Paul did Rome. If we do not long that, what is our fellowship? If we want to be in a building for the sake of being in a building, that’s not fellowship. Let us long with godly desire to be together to encourage and love one another mutually.

 

3. The Wrath of God. Paul begins this section by reminding his readers that the Gospel is the power of God for salvation! The power of God to save! But what does the Gospel save us from? Paul answers that in verse 18. The wrath of God. The Gospel is not good news without the bad news. We often don’t like to discuss this, but the bad news is that those who are without Christ will suffer the wrath of God. The Gospel is Jesus taking that wrath for you. Paul lays it out clearly that we are without excuse. To put off trusting in Christ, to deny the presence of God, to claim exception because of your suffering is not an excuse. We know that God is there. We know that we are sinful. We know these things, and yet what we do with them is on us. Paul writes that they had exchanged the truth for a lie, and therefore, God gave them over to their desires. Friends, we see a world that surrounds us that has been given over to its desires. To live a life devoted to Gods’ Word is utterly foreign in our culture today. Rather, it is doing whatever makes you happy. Paul gives strong and hard language for this in the final verse. They know that they are in sin, and realize they should suffer the consequences, but they approve of these things. To me, this gives me a stronger passion for making the message of Christ known. That people would experience and hear the good news of Jesus.

 

So what do we do? First, let our lives be dedicated to bringing glory to God! He is our first love and greatest joy. Secondly, let us long for fellowship. Let us reach out to others and encourage them today. Thirdly and lastly, let us long to make the Gospel known in our community. Jesus is coming back soon; let’s not waste another moment. I look forward to unpacking God’s Word more.

 

Pastor Aaron

Daily Devotion

Start your Monday off right!

I hope that this email finds you well. I want to encourage you to press forward in following the Lord. Trust in Him during this time.

 

Read Acts 27

In this chapter, we see Paul in action. We understand how he leads during the chaos. They are on a ship, and the storm is going to wreck them. Everyone on the boat was in great fear, and Paul led them during this time. Doesn’t it feel like the world is in a giant storm? People are looking to the government to lead, and they fall short. People are in great fear and anxiety. Now is the time for us believers to lead and show what it means to rely on God.

 

1. Paul prays. The first thing that we must be doing amid this storm is praying. You can’t lead people to the Lord if you are not communing with Him. Spend time in prayer. Take time to be with the Lord, seek Him, go to Him. Paul was in constant prayer with the Lord.

 

2. Paul Leads. During the chaos, Paul gives hope. Amid this storm, Paul points people to where they can find hope. The one that really can save them. Friends, that is what we do. We pray to Him; we read His Word, we find rest and hope in His reality, then we share the faith we have to others. We let them see where they can find rest amid a storm.

 

3. Paul Trusts. Not only did Paul talk the talk, but he also walked the walk. He believed that the Lord would keep him safe. He knew the Lord was going to protect Him. He knew that God was trustworthy. Then his life reflected it. Do people see you trusting in the Lord right now? Or do they see fear and panic? You can trust in the Lord and be wise. But as believers, we should not fear.

 

Take hope, my friends.

 

Pastor Aaron

Daily Devotion

It’s Sunday!

I hope that you can join us for Facebook live at facebook.com/SBCKY.

I pray that you are also encouraged by our daily reading.

 

Read Acts 26

Paul makes his defense before the king. In his defense, we see him do as he had done before. Paul shared his story. Not only does Paul share his story, but he makes sure to include the Gospel in his story. Many times I’ve heard people share their testimonies only to have Jesus be a small footnote. The point of sharing your story is to point to Christ, not ourselves. Let’s look at Paul for how we ought to share our story.

 

1. Who you were before Christ. Paul shares and even gets his persecutors to agree with him on his zeal for persecuting Christians. He shares his upbringing in the appropriate context. We should see that there are aspects of our story that we need to share, and there are other aspects that are not necessary to tell our story. Again, the point is not to make much of your past, but to make much of Jesus! Paul needed to share of his wretched past to make much of Christ.

 

2. How you met Christ. Paul shares about his encounter with Christ. How he was confronted with the truth of the Gospel, this is where you share the Gospel that you find hope in that you found hope in Jesus Christ alone. Through His death and resurrection. Which I must ask you, have you trusted in Christ? If not, repent of your sin and turn to Christ today!

 

3. How has Christ changed you? Now, Paul, the persecutor, is now sharing the story of the Gospel and being persecuted himself. He lives to make Christ known. The truth of the Gospel should change every aspect of your life. He makes alive what was once dead.

 

Friends, today is a great day to share your story with someone. Invite someone to watch service with you. Let people know of the hope you have.

Pastor Aaron

Daily Devotion

Daily Devotion.

I hope to encourage you every morning with insights from our reading plan. I pray that this is an encouragement to you. Please let me know what speaks to you today!

 

Read Acts 24

The Apostle Paul suffered tremendous hardship. As we read in Acts 24, he was brought before Felix to give his defense. In his defense, he gave the similarities of hopes that he and the Jews had in common. That there would be a resurrection of the just and the unjust. He went on to have more significant conversations with Felix about his faith in Jesus Christ. Here we see Paul is put in prison and from prison is where he would write many of his great letters that we still read to this day.

 

Paul said in his defense that he believed everything in the Law and the prophets. Today there is a trend amongst some Christians that we should throw out the Old Testament and only look to the New. They say that the New Testament is what we need, not the Old Testament laws that are not relevant to us today. I would implore you to not buy into this. It is in the Old Testament that we find the prophecies that speak of the coming Christ. It is the Old Testament that we look to and see the Law that convicts of sin. So from this passage, I have a few thoughts I would like to share with you.

 

1. Be prepared to share. We are told to be ready to share the hope that you have. Are you prepared to tell your story at any moment? Are you willing to tell others when the opportunity presents itself to tell others of the great hope that you have in Christ?

 

2. Read the Old Testament. Spend time in the Old Testament. See how they point to the great savior that is Christ. Spend time in falling in love with our good and gracious Lord.

 

3. Encourage others in the midst of trial. Paul would go on to encourage many believers from behind bars. While he spent his time waiting for his execution, he used it to encourage others. How are you using this time that we are not able to gather in public? Are you encouraging others? How do you love folks?

 

I want you to know that I miss worshipping with you. I can not wait for the day that we meet again. What a glorious day that will be! We will praise the Lord like never before!

Pastor Aaron

Daily Devotion

Daily Devotion.

I hope to encourage you every morning with insights from our reading plan. I pray that this is an encouragement to you. Please let me know what speaks to you today!

 

Read Acts 24

The Apostle Paul suffered tremendous hardship. As we read in Acts 24, he was brought before Felix to give his defense. In his defense, he gave the similarities of hopes that he and the Jews had in common. That there would be a resurrection of the just and the unjust. He went on to have more significant conversations with Felix about his faith in Jesus Christ. Here we see Paul is put in prison and from prison is where he would write many of his great letters that we still read to this day.

 

Paul said in his defense that he believed everything in the Law and the prophets. Today there is a trend amongst some Christians that we should throw out the Old Testament and only look to the New. They say that the New Testament is what we need, not the Old Testament laws that are not relevant to us today. I would implore you to not buy into this. It is in the Old Testament that we find the prophecies that speak of the coming Christ. It is the Old Testament that we look to and see the Law that convicts of sin. So from this passage, I have a few thoughts I would like to share with you.

 

1. Be prepared to share. We are told to be ready to share the hope that you have. Are you prepared to tell your story at any moment? Are you willing to tell others when the opportunity presents itself to tell others of the great hope that you have in Christ?

 

2. Read the Old Testament. Spend time in the Old Testament. See how they point to the great savior that is Christ. Spend time in falling in love with our good and gracious Lord.

 

3. Encourage others in the midst of trial. Paul would go on to encourage many believers from behind bars. While he spent his time waiting for his execution, he used it to encourage others. How are you using this time that we are not able to gather in public? Are you encouraging others? How do you love folks?

 

I want you to know that I miss worshipping with you. I can not wait for the day that we meet again. What a glorious day that will be! We will praise the Lord like never before!

Pastor Aaron